Shinyokohama Raumen Museum Shinyokohama Raumen Museum Shinyokohama Raumen Museum
The Shin-Yokohama Raumen Museum is a food amusement park located in Yokohama devoted to the Japanese ramen and features a large underground recreation of Tokyo with actual ramen restaurants.  These ramen shops come from all over Japan: Sapporo, Asahikawa, Fukushima, Tokyo, Yokohama, Wakayama, Hakata, and Kumamoto, each with their local tastes and identities.

 

The museum from the outside…notice the bowls on top!

Shinyokohama Raumen Museum

The museum underground….fake sky!

Shinyokohama Raumen Museum

I still have no idea where I’m going…

Shinyokohama Raumen Museum

Shinyokohama Raumen Museum

Pay for your ramen from the vending machine outside!  All done before sitting down…so brilliantly Japanese!  Some buttons have pictures…some don’t!  Take your best guess and see what gets cooked up for you! =)

Shinyokohama Raumen Museum

We visited two of the ramen restaurants…here’s what we got:

Toride area /Tokyo prefecture

  • category: tonkotsu (豚骨, “pork bone”).  Cloudy white colored broth made by boiling pork bones, fat, and collagen over high heat for many hours!
  • basic seasoning: soy sauce
  • ingredients: pork

Shinyokohama Raumen Museum

Shinasobaya area / Kanagawa prefecture

  • category: shoyu (soy sauce) – clear brown broth, chicken or vegetable based.
  • basic seasoning: soy sauce
  • ingredients: chicken, seafood, pork, ginger, garlic

Shinyokohama Raumen Museum

Hungry Cactus’ Verdict: B-

It’s hard to actually consider the Raumen Museum a museum, because it’s really more like a restaurant sampler than anything else.  And mind you, at ~$3 entrance fee and ~$8/ramen, things can really add up quickly!  (Granted, they have smaller sampler bowls, but ~$6 makes it a bad value).

As for taste — their no frills ramens were neither amazing nor horrible.  It might be that I just haven’t tried the ‘better’ ones yet, but understand you can only stuff yourself with 2~3 bowls in a visit!

So far, ramen is still ramen to me.  Nothing too special.  But if I were to pick my favorite, it would have to be the tonkotsu (pork bone) ramen.  I like the complexity and harmony of the flavors and textures.

Overall, the museum wasn’t that interesting.  You’d probably enjoy an authentic and specialized ramen restaurant instead.

Categories: foodtravel